QUALITIES OF CLASSIC LITTLE CHILDREN

We need not personalize the situation as regards the children, this world of ours being replete with them. Indeed, we need not go out of our way or inconvenience ourselves in efforts to identify with them, the characteristics that they display being clearly defined and identified even apart from them, and we need not go to extremes to set them up as signs, they being superseded by the ideals to which they point. However, in the qualities of classic little children, we are provided with a wonderful example of the interplay that ought to exist among human beings and the interface that ought to interconnect human beings. Truly, ours will be a decent world when the qualities of classic little children form the interface between humans. Mind you, that adults are called upon to so bear themselves doesnít mean that they should behave naively; what it does say is that, given continuousness, they would do well to adopt the way of the child as a human interface in so far as growth towards glory is concerned.
What, then, are the qualities of the classic little child, which grownups would do well to emulate? No doubt, there are many such qualities. We examine, here, seven, which well up.

GIVEN TO GROWTH

Text Box: Little children provide us with a wonderful example of the interplay that ought to exist among human beings and the interface that ought to interconnect human beings. Truly, ours will be a decent world when each human being becomes a little child to and towards every other human being.

Children are given to growth. Of course, they grow towards adulthood, symbolically the acme of any process of human development. Indeed, intellectually, children experience phenomenal growth, and bodily, rapid growth. The view is that they are at the stage at which, being vacant, they must be fed with much knowledge. And, of course, acutely aware that they are given to growth (they cannot but be acutely aware), they accept agog the knowledge associated with growth. In fact, both children and their adult guardians are acutely aware that children are given to growth. At once, this makes for harmony and orderliness between children and parents. And this is important, harmony between children and parents.
††††††††† By this token, adults also ought to embrace the growth concept. Given that we grow towards a goal, surely, none of us can say that we have it made or that we have attained to the acme of glory or grandeur. This is why it is important that we embrace the growth concept. We will see that this makes for harmony between parents and children.

Look around us. Is there a perfect city or nation? Can any nation or, for that matter, individual families, which go to make that nation, be said to be truly vigorful or glorious? What with all the decadence and chaos that characterize the nations of this world, no nation has arrived at this exalted status, therefore the growth concept. The very urgency of our situation, the seemingly immeasurable gap between our current situation on the one hand and, on the other, the glory or beauty towards which we strive, ought to drive home to us that, like the classic little child, we are all growthlings. This being so, ought not we to open our eyes to the insidiousness of shortfalls; see how they belie glory.
Yet, having arrived at adulthood, we tend to become less zealous as regards the growth concept. This ought not to be, given that growth takes us to a glory, which does not now describe us. You see how zealous little children are? This is so by virtue of an acute awareness that they are given to growth. Such awareness seems to manifest itself in a permanent zeal. Their view is that they are very much alive. And so it should be with us grown-ups. It is necessary that we be very much alive and given to growth if we must make any headway towards glory or heyday. Yes, consider zealous little children.

UNDER RULE

Indeed, this is one of the principal and pointed characteristics of children. They are under the rule of grownups, their parents or guardians. Of course, given the frailties and shortcomings of the human being, this makes the child most vulnerable. Even more reason to make sure that the child is ruled with loving authority.
However, this is not the purpose of this page, nor shall we, at this time, dwell upon the shortfalls of those who bear rule in this regard. The fact is that children are under rule; such is their nature, they cannot but be directed and shaped by the nature of this rule.

††††††††† This being so, it is important that every adult be under rule by a grander, more exalted authority. Unfortunately, some of us have the notion that having arrived at adulthood, we ought to slough off all rule in order to stamp the independence suggested by adulthood, or if we cannot, the orientation given by adulthood instills in us an eagerness that seeks to cast off all rule not on par with our graspingness.
Now this ought not to be. Given that we journey to a mark, the need for related rule in the life of every man is clear.

Text Box: The family unit has but two or more little children abiding by the one rule, such that no one member makes the rules, but they come from a higher source. The members of family all see themselves as little children under the one umbrella, reading the same cannon, living by the same things, and looking to the one summit.

It is this absence of rule from a more exalted and loving authority that causes husbands to abuse their authority. You see, many husbands adopt the view that they are the source of rule within the home, thereby cutting off a higher, more loving authority, indeed, all light, all resource and succor, though it may not appear so to be. Now this courts disaster, for without recourse to help that comes from the glory that we aim at, we imperfect beings cannot but grope in the dark. Let the husband or father, and every family-member refer to the classic little child that all may be aware that the family unit has but two or more little children abiding by the one rule, such that no one member makes the rules, but they come from a higher source. The members of family all see themselves as little children under the one rule or umbrella, reading the same cannon, living by the same things, and looking to the one summit. Now this is not meant to cast aspersions on the concept of independence. Independence is a viable principle only when practiced aright. Let us say that adequate rule pertains to the body of concepts or principles that we follow enroute to glory. Rest assured, then, that the rule of the concepts or principles of the glory towards which we journey, we must come under. As such, they have been handed down to us, and are not ours, per se.

GAMESOMENESS

Against the background of the graveness of the times, we may say that such a characteristic is out of place, yet, is it, really. That often times we are casual as regard play, that what is seen as play cannot be said to be truly such in that the spirit of competition governs, that play itself is often seen as an escape from the stressful atmosphere of our time, do not necessarily mean that we should not approach lifeís experiences gamesomely. In this regard, the way of the child beckons. Healthy children have an inclination to transform every pleasant experience into an occasion for play, if factors so allow. Not just toys regale them, but every pleasant experience; breakfast, for example.
Lovely attitude, this.

††††††††† Ought not we to regale ourselves with work; (indeed, to beguile work itself, work itself should beguile us); ought not we to regard work, indeed, every acceptable endeavor, as occasion for play. Since it is not so, we live in a stressful world. This system of ours will not allow us to beguile ourselves with work and with other fields of endeavor, what with all the morbid stress and chaos-the futile or uncalled-for ordeals-associated with those practices. This being so, we would do well to appreciate that work ought to regale us and ought to be an occasion for play.

††††††††† This principle comes to bear even at school. It is amazing the stressful atmosphere created in our schools. One would think that children, in their studies, have everything in their favor, inasmuch as there is no greater source of enthrallment than that which comes from bites into gist, and, by chewing upon the truths contained therein, a grasp of truths very crux. The idea is that we ought to be regaled by our understanding of concepts, yet, lamentably, this is not so. In these times, schoolwork is often associated with stress and nervousness. This ought not to be, for in the classroom, who has the most excellent disposition? Is it not the one with a good grasp of concepts?

Yes, we would do well to create a system that allows us to beguile ourselves with work and with other fields of endeavor. You see, our system is so structured as to create seeming escape routes from bottled up or suppressed feelings. Thus, we resort to futile revelry and to other outlandish escape routes to rid ourselves of suppressed or bottled up feelings, or rather, to suppress them or to keep them bottled up. Know this, though; bottled up or suppressed feelings exist still. Out for an escape, they are likely to rear their ugly heads at any inapt time.

CHILDREN ARE MOLDABLE

Why are children moldable so? It is proper to conclude that they are moldable by virtue of an acute awareness that they grow from a state of childhood, with its childish anatomy, to a state of adulthood, of course, with its adult anatomy. It is an urgent transition, which, according to their simple minds, ought to run its course freely. Therein lies the reason why children are moldable so.
But we adults believe that we have it made as a result of a full-grown anatomy, that further growth is not an urgent business, and that the unpliantness suggested by adulthood is a fixture.

††††††††† Let the little child jolt us from such betise. Consider the child and come to the conclusion that growth is synonymous with life. In its absence, there cannot but be degeneration, humans being continuous or mobile. This being so, we would do well to acquire the moldability of the little child, for, after all, humans small or great, children or grown-ups, are moldable and may be bent this way or that way towards grandeur. Of course, in our hardened state, we may become irreconcilable, yet this will be found to be true not only of grown-ups but of the child also. You see, given right and wrong, beauty and ugliness, nobility and ignobility, glory and ingloriousness, uprightness and crookedness, we adults may be shaped wholesomely. Remember, we ought to be innate growthlings, and, as such, ought to be bendable this way or that way towards grandeur. To adopt a different stance belies human dignity.

RESILIENCE

Itís been said above that children are moldable by virtue of an acute awareness that they grow from a state of childhood with its childish anatomy to a state of adulthood with its adult anatomy. This very awareness makes the child resilient.

Encarta defines resilience as speedy recovery from problems or the ability to recover quickly from setbacks. Literally, it is the ability of matter to spring back quickly into shape after being bent, stretched or deformed. Children own resilience because, as their childish anatomy suggests, their whole life lies before them. It is an indictment upon this world of ours that it should be replete with unwarranted and futile examples of such resilience-Iraq, Afghanistan, Africa (Sudan, Congo, Uganda, etc.) all provide examples of such futile resilience. Resilient these children are, yes, yet to direct them glorywards, it takes skill, the absence of which sees unwanted experiences contributing to a distorted mold.

That said, we adults would do well to adopt the resilience of classic little children. This is not to say that we should invite futile experiences. An experience may be said to be worthwhile if it serves to raise us to a more honorable and exalted realm, otherwise it is futile. Even so, our very nature dictates setbacks. Lacking resilience thereupon, we lose sight of the goal. Perhaps this is so because of wrong or ulterior motives. Absent is an honorable goal that goes to make or shape us and to give us values. Thus, it is not so much a body of rules or laws to live by as it is the goal striven towards. Shaping us, making us strong, the honorable goal is all important and takes precedence over all else.

As adults, we should realise, also, that as long as we are in this world, the onus is upon us to remain alive and to be a light. And even with a few hours or days left, we can emerge out of setbacks to be a vibrant tree of life, for seeds take but a short time to germinate and to become a tree. The seed having been implanted, it takes but a while to produce the man.

IMITATORS

A child grows to become grown-up. That it grows is proof enough of a goal, the presence of which serves as spur. One senses the zeal of the child, as it seeks to stamp and thus make the world of adulthood its childhood days. Obviously, impressed with the goal, the child, a great imitator, transforms itself into its miniature type.

††††††††† Just as it is with the child, so it should be with the adult. Looking into the mirror of that glorious mark, which so impresses as to make us in scale its glorious type, we become practicing images of and imperfect things journeying towards our goal: The history student, for example, is within limits, a practicing historian; likewise, the student of mathematics or of economics is within limits-in scale-a practicing mathematician or a practicing economist. Adopting this approach, the mark that we work towards becomes not only a goal but also our life. Interesting!

Text Box: Why are children moldable so? It is proper to conclude that they are moldable by virtue of an acute awareness that they grow from a state of childhood, with its childish anatomy, to a state of adulthood, of course, with its adult anatomy. It is an urgent transition, which, according to their simple minds, ought to run its course freely. The secret of their moldability exists therein. At once, they provide us with a clear-cut hypothesis, which makes for a glorious piece of philosophy.

††††††††† Mind you, to be a historian, mathematician, and economist, important as they are, ought to be not the benchmark around which all revolve but necessary subsidiaries revolving around the principal goal, which really is glory, grandeur, honor, et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. Shall I say that the nucleus on which all other goals subsist and towards which we, with our unitary goals, ought to orient for very life is indeed glory, honor, and beauty.

††††††††† What then is a goal? Let the classic little child give us the picturesque description that we seek. The classic little child tells us vividly that a goal is a superlative towards which we increase or wax as a matter of course. Let us not think that the goal that we work towards is whims, fancies, or a far-off bliss that we yearn for because of the unpleasantness of our experiences. Be it understood that forlornness and hopelessness are born from such circumstances. Indeed, all this the classic little child conveys to us.

The idea is that a goal is such to the extent that it is scaleable and, as such, an improvement upon the present.
Yes, little children are great imitators; lovely characteristic, this. Let us adopt it, and thereby never lose sight of the superlative.

CHILDREN ARE DRESSY

See how dressy little children are! They pay much attention to dressing up: Come church or some other momentous occasion in which they must be appropriately dressed, they relish the opportunity to be so clothed. Perhaps, subconsciously they sense a deficiency of some good quality pictured by the decorous outfit or, perhaps, in their mind-eyes, their childish anatomy suggests empty vessels, which must be plenished, or an ineptness, which must be traded for more acceptable qualities.

††††††††† Mind you, the child is not fussy about this whole question of being decorously clothed, which is somewhat surprising, given that they relish the idea. No doubt, this suggests an uncanny awareness of what it is to be praiseworthily clothed: Yes, though they have a childish anatomy and have lived relatively few years, they own so many days of experience and are well able to be aucourant with the acceptable and with the unacceptable. This being so, they allow themselves to be clothed with decorousness.

††††††††† We adults, however, seem to be different. We do not seem to know what redounds to our glory, though we literally own so many years or so many days of experience, which is perplexing, really. The question, therefore, thrusts itself forward: Every human being has lived so many years, and, therefore, ought to have so many years, or so many days, of experience, yet why has not every human being the experience of the number of his or her days? In this regard, little children seem more adept than grown-ups who will not allow conscience to have its indisputable say. The failures of the children in this area are due to the level of the vigor or to the wooliness (both of which are affected, to some degree or other, by grown-ups) to which they have recourse.

††††††††† Ought not we to have the approach of little children? Let us not delude ourselves into believing that being already clothed as grown-ups, we need not beclothe ourselves further. Adopt this approach, the sequel cannot but be a subtle degeneration. Therefore, let us grown-ups deliberately clothe ourselves with glory and beauty. Being well and truly lit by some superlative, we ought to cast away with some agog such filthiness or unsightliness as beclothes us. Get thee hence, we must say with some vehemence of our filthy garments as we clothe ourselves praiseworthily with honor and glory.

MALICE-FREE

This is a requisite for a trouble-free world, yet such is the disorientation of, it would seem, the whole of humankind, oursí a war-torn and troubled world because we have lost our bearings. We do not seem to realize that life here on earth is an out and out thoroughfare; the one route takes us to glory, the other to dishonor. Yet we live our lives as if unaware of this. This results in disorientation or lack of proper focus, which triggers off useless and futile troubles serving no purpose. For this reason, many have lost the ability to forbear. The pleasant characteristic of goodwill no longer describes manís dealings with man; and where has pleasant patience gone? You see, it does not take much to trigger off deeds of malice. One would think that so many years of life would have made us adults mighty in character.
And by the way, children are not particular about the egoistic limelight; they will not seek to get it by whatever means necessary.

Text Box: Every human being has lived so many years, and, therefore, ought to have so many years, or so many days, of experience, yet why has not every human being the experience of the number of his or her days? In this regard, little children seem more adept than grown-ups who will not allow conscience to have its indisputable say.

††††††††† Let us take a lesson from classic little children. Unless things get out of hand, as it would seem that they have been allowed to (witness some of what emerges into the world of adulthood}, the child is properly oriented. In other words, the children know where they stand in relation to the goal towards which they work; and if concepts flowing from this very goal were to be used to correct them, then so be it: ever willing to grow, they submit willingly to authority positioned above them. Made teachable because of an acute awareness of the growth process evident in their childish anatomy, they accept agog the concepts and correction that, in their minds, set them on the road to life. Aware of their immaturity, they accept willingly the correction that makes them straight.

††††††††† However, not so adults, disoriented because of not being alive to the concept that the child provides a symbol that pictures a stage in adult-growth and development. If only adults would heed the lesson portrayed thereby, this would go a long way towards setting them on course.

That we drew attention to the need for grown-ups to adopt the characteristics of the child as regard growth brings to bear the concept of the adult-child, that is, the man-child or the woman-child. This being so, the classic little child becomes, at once, a role model, which it ought to continue to be, even during its adult years, so becoming, itself, an example of the classic man-child or woman-child; intriguing concept, this. Besides, both parties fulfilling their responsibilities, the bridging of the generation gap will begin to occur.
††††††††† The conclusion is that the child is the responsibility of not only the parents and grown-ups but also the child itself. Dare I say that both parties are their own and each otherís responsibility? Is not the child a role model, to a point? That the child is a role model ought to go a long way towards bridging the generation gap. This places the relationship in a more complete light.
Let this relationship between the grown-up and the child be happily improved. Indeed, let the generation gap be bridged.

To top of document †††††††††††††††

†††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††